English title: Comparing the Happiness Effects of Real and On-Line Friends

Author(s): John F. Helliwell - Haifang Huang -

Language: English

Type: Journal article

Year: 2013

Abstract

A recent large Canadian survey permits us to compare face-to-face (‘real-life’) and on-line social networks as sources of subjective well-being. The sample of 5,000 is drawn randomly from an on-line pool of respondents, a group well placed to have and value on-line friendships. We find three key results. First, the number of real-life friends is positively correlated with subjective well-being (SWB) even after controlling for income, demographic variables and personality differences. Doubling the number of friends in real life has an equivalent effect on well-being as a 50% increase in income. Second, the size of online networks is largely uncorrelated with subjective well-being. Third, we find that real-life friends are much more important for people who are single, divorced, separated or widowed than they are for people who are married or living with a partner. Findings from large international surveys (the European Social Surveys 2002–2008) are used to confirm the importance of real-life social networks to SWB; they also indicate a significantly smaller value of social networks to married or partnered couples.

Volume: 8

Issue: 9

From page no: 0

To page no: 0

Refereed: Yes

DOI: 10.1371/JOURNAL.PONE.0072754

Journal: PLoS ONE

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