English title: The influence of education on differences in depressive symptoms between men and women in Slovenia

Author(s): Tanja Kamin - Nejc Berzelak - Mirjana Ule -

Language: English

Type: Journal article

Year: 2011

Abstract

Background: This paper discusses depressive symptoms among men and women in Slovenia and their relationship to various socioeconomic factors, and education in particular. Methods: The analysis is based on the European Social Survey Round 3 (ESS-3) from 2006, for the Slovene population (n = 1,282). Depressive symptoms, as a dependent variable, are measured using an 8-item version of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D 8) scale. Independent variables included in the research model are: gender, age, education, income, marital and employment status and the presence of a child under the age of 12 in the household. Using mean comparisons of depression symptoms and regression analyses, the paper presents gender differences in depression levels and factors that influence it. Results: Education contributes to lower depression levels in both genders; however, its influence is substantially higher among women. Depression symptoms are closely related to education. Lower educated women show a significantly higher score in depression symptoms than lower educated men. However, higher educated women show better mental health than higher educated men. Different sociodemographic factors influence the levels of depression symptoms differently between genders. The impact of housework as an employment status thus significantly influences higher levels of depression only among men. Similar indications for age, widowhood and the absence of partnership. In contrast, the influence of work disability on depression is only significant for women. Conclusion: The influence of socioeconomic and cultural factors on depression symptoms is greater for women than men.

Volume: 51

Issue: 1

From page no: 33

To page no: 42

Refereed: Yes

DOI: 10.2478/V10152-012-0005-0

Journal: Slovenian Journal of Public Health